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Author Topic: Cryogenic engine treatments...  (Read 1662 times)

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Pin_cushion

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« on: March 31, 2009, 19:22:34 PM »
 
Simple question really...
Has anyone ever had any engine part treated...?
More interested in experience of engine internals/block treatment than steering/suspension parts...
Obviously when ya first see what its called ya think  ££££££££'s although it doesnt actually seem that expensive obviously depending on what ya can expect in return...

Any thoughts, opinions, experiences...?

Pin_cushion...



Offline capri v8 driver

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2009, 19:42:52 PM »
i know off a few people on corral that tryed it on stock block and parts, but it did not make much off a differance and called it a waste off money.
greetz Paul.

Capri V8 Driver.

Pin_cushion

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2009, 20:00:30 PM »
Corral...?
Didn't make much difference to what...?

Main thing I'm thinking is vehicles that have known common weak spots...
I've had 2  rovers  
220 16v and 214 16v between them i broke, think it was about 3 gearboxes and maybe 6 driveshafts in the space of maybe 2 years...
Then maybe on another side of it the 24v can't rev due to conrods/bolts and block (is that right?) so maybe cryo would allow the rev limit to be raised safely at a far less cost (than expensive parts)?

Just my observations...
Feel free to tell me to shut up people...
Even if it's just so i can say, 'NO!!!'  

Pin_cushion...
« Last Edit: March 31, 2009, 20:01:50 PM by Pin_cushion »

Offline littlegems4x4

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2009, 20:21:07 PM »
Hmmmm I was reading that as well and wondering whether to have my crank/rods/pistons done

Offline Tony

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2009, 23:25:34 PM »
the failier of an over reving 24v is due to block flex. ya cant solve that with any  treatment like that, ya just need a bottom end brace.

p.s there is no way you can compair a ford to a poxy rover!  ggrrrrr

the 24v xr4i auto-0 to 60 in 6.71 secs

Offline Dave

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2009, 23:36:15 PM »

It's not a cure as it only improves things slightly, not enough to really make a difference is my view.

Frode (BR Racing) use to work in a plant that did all that stuff so ask him.
Dave

Offline Dave2302

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2009, 03:29:09 AM »
       

"Poxy Rover"

       
It's nice to be important but
It's more important to be nice

Doughnutter

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2009, 09:21:01 AM »
I had a long talk with one of the top technical people in our motorport department about this and he was very positive about the traetment. It turns austunite into martintite or something    can't remember fully, but it also relives the stress inside the material. Its been used for a fair while now. He said it made a huge difference in his experience, mainly with race bikes (road and BSB). The lads who race Pulsar turbos swear by them. Once they got to 400bhp they were killing 2 or 3 box's a season, now they cold treat them and get a whole season out of a box.

Pin_cushion

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Cryogenic engine treatments...
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2009, 14:21:45 PM »
Quote from: maddoldbugger
the failier of an over reving 24v is due to block flex. ya cant solve that with any  treatment like that, ya just need a bottom end brace.

p.s there is no way you can compair a ford to a poxy rover!  ggrrrrr

Flex I would imagine is one of the issues the treatment attempts to overcome, by in effect making the material denser...  
Not saying its an alternative to a girdle (what can a 24v be revved to with one fitted?) but for pieces that are expensive might be worth a thought...  
If you wanted to rev a 24v BOA (not soley interested in 24v just using an example) what would internally break 1st, 2nd, 3rd...?

P.s Not comparing just giving a couple of examples...  

Quote from: Doughnutter
I had a long talk with one of the top technical people in our motorport department about this and he was very positive about the traetment. It turns austunite into martintite or something    can't remember fully, but it also relives the stress inside the material. Its been used for a fair while now. He said it made a huge difference in his experience, mainly with race bikes (road and BSB). The lads who race Pulsar turbos swear by them. Once they got to 400bhp they were killing 2 or 3 box's a season, now they cold treat them and get a whole season out of a box.

Yeah thats the kinda thing I've been reading about, not exactly a road car scenario but the pros/cons are the same...
I know it's been around for years but as a rule when things are first thought up there not quite up to scrath however as more people invest in an area it generally improves, judging by more companies becoming involved i would imagine it's getting to the mainstream useable market...  (if any of that makes sense...)

Not really interested in the technical side of it as no doubt it will go straight over my head but would be good if someone could say first hand about there experiences...

Pin_cushion...

 

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